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Battelle Family


 

Descendants of Ebenezer Battelle

 

 

Generation No. 1

 

        1.  Col. Ebenezer1 Battelle  (EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 04 Feb 1754 in Dedham Massachusetts, and died 10 Jan 1815 in Newport Ohio.  He married Nancy Anna Durant 07 Jun 1775 in Boston MA.  She was born 1753 in Portsmouth NH, and died Jun 1815 in At Sea, returning from St. Croix.

 

Notes for Col. Ebenezer Battelle:

Historical annals of Dedham : from its settlement in 1635 to 1847

Dedham, Mass.: Print. and pub. by H. Mann, 1847, 136 pgs.

page 79 - Town Clerk in 1778 for two years

A Catalog of Natives of Dedham who have graduated at Harvard University.

page 89,90 - 1775: Ebenezer Battelle, the son of Ebenezer and Prudence Battelle, born February 4, 1754; merchant in Boston; returned to Dedham; engaged in  Merchandize; Colonel of Melitia; married Nancy Durant of Boston; removed to Marietta, Ohio, with pioneer emigrants in 1788; settled at newport; died January 10, 1815

 

 

From "The History of Belpre, Ohio"

        Col. Battelle was the only son of Ebenezer Battelle and was born at Dedham, Mass., and graduated from Cambridge [sic. Harvard]1775. He held a commission of Colonel under the Governor of Massachusetts in the Militia. He was one of the active partners in a book store in Boston for about six years. While there he was elected to the command of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, a noted band of military men, composed of officers of good standing and character.

        He became an associate in the Ohio company and came to Marietta with Colonel May in the Spring of 1788 and his family came in November of the same year. During the following winter he became a member of the Belpre Association and in the spring of 1789 proceeded to clear his land and erect a stout block house for the reception of his family. On May 1st, Captain King was killed by Indians. The following day Col. Battelle, with two of his sons and Griffin Greene, Esq., embarked at Marietta in a large canoe, with farming tools, provisions, & etc. On their way down they were hailed by someone from the shore and informed of this day's event. They landed and held a consultation on what was best to be done. Some were for returning; but they finally decided to proceed.

        The block-houses of these two emigrants were near each other, and nearly opposite the middle of Backus' Island, on the spot occupied by farmer's Castle. After landing the other settlers joined them for mutual defence, and through the night kept up a military guard, in the old revolutionary style, the sentinel calling our every fifteen minutes. "All's Well" not thinking this would give the skulking Indians notice where to find them. No enemy, however, molested them during the night, and the fears of an attack gradually subsided.

        Early in April, before any families had moved on to the ground, a party of officers from Fort Harmar, with their wives, and a few ladies from Marietta made a visit to the new twelve oars, These were the first white females who ever set foot on the soil of Belpre. O their return Col. Battelle, with several others, accompanied them by water in a canoe, and another party by land. While on the voyage, a large bear was discovered swimming across the river. The landsmen fires at him with their muskets and rifles, but without effect. The canoe then ranged alongside, when Col Battelle seized him by the tail and when the bear attempted to bite his hand, he raised his hind parts, throwing his head under the water, and thus escaped his teeth. One of his companions soon killed him with an axe. He weighted over three hundred pounds and afforded several fine dinners to his captors.

        In the plan of Farmers Castle his blockhouse occupied the north east corner. Col. Battelle was very much interested in Education and religion in the settlement. Both schools and religious services were held in a large room in his block house. He officiated as Chaplain when no clergyman was present. Some times he gave a discourse of his own but oftener read a sermon of some eminent divine. He made Sunday respected and honored in the settlement. In the early years he was paid twenty dollars by the Ohio Company for his services as a religious teacher. He died in the home of his son at Newport, Ohio in 1815.

       

Col. Ebenezer and Ann Durant Battelle are listed with the settlers who came to Marietta in 1789. Listed as living at Farmer's Castle in Belpre during the 1790 - 1795 Indian wars are: "Col Ebenezer Battelle, wife and 4 children, Cornelius, Ebenezer, Thomas, Lousia."

 

BATTELLE, Ebenezer (Col.) - Son of Ebenezer Battelle, Esq. of Dedham, Mass. He married Anna Durant, the daughter of Cornelius Durant, Esq., a rich merchant of Boston. They had 4 children.

From the MEMOIRS OF THE EARLY PIONEER SETTLERS OF OHIO By S.P. Hildreth, M.D., 1854

 

George J. Blazier, West Virginia History, Charleston WV, Vol. 15, No. 3, April 1954

Thomas Battelle [was] the first to depart from England for America. Thomas (d. 1706) came to Massachusetts Bay colony before 1640, and settled at Dedham. He became a farmer, a vocation followed also by his son John, and his grandson, Ebenezer. In addition to the hazzards of everday life, these three generations were beset by threats of Indian uprisings and the English-Franch Wars which involved the colonies in America. Ebenezer [b. 1729] , a graduate of Harvard College, lived through the period of agitation for the indepence of the American colonies. He was captain of militia, and he and his company answered the alarm of April 19, 1775, and marched to the scene of the battles of Lexington and Concord. His son, Ebenezer Jr., [b. 1754] the first of the Battelle name to migrate to the Ohio River country, was a member of his father's company, and following the battle of Lexington, served in the colonial forces until his discharge in 1779. Following his discharge he was commissioned by the Govenor of Massachusetts as a colonel of militia; henceforth, he was known as Colonel Battelle.

 

On Religious faith: Battelles in America have been known throughout the entire period from 1640 on for their strong religious faith and for their support of the churches to which they subscribed. Colonel Ebenezer [b.1754]  who was graduated from Harvard College [Hildreth states Cambridge] in 1774, had been trained for the Christian ministry. However, he was invested with the same pioneer spirit that carried his great, [great] grandfather, Thomas, from England to the new country, a spirit which challenged Col. Ebenezer to seek out opportunities in the frontier region of that nation which was born out of the Revolutionary War.

 

On the Bookstore in Boston: Following the cessation of the fighting in 1781, he established a bookstore on Marlborough Street [now Washington), in Boston. This bookshop soon became a meeting place for the reading public of Boston who came to browse about the shelves, often to make purchases, and to chat informally about the English authors whose works were being imported from abroad. The informal discussions more often took the direction of speculation upon the furtue of the new nation, the belated war-time pay of the soldiers, the possibilities of cashing their military land warrants in the West. This land was then in the process of being ceded to the general government by Virginia, Connicticut, and Massachusetts.

 

On the Trip to Marietta: Details of the journey are sparse from April 6 until May 4, 1788. On that day Colonel John May, who had departed from Boston on April 14 for the same destination, but by another route, wrote in his diary: "This day we crossed the Laurel Mountain and Chestnut Ridge, and at night fell in with Colonel Battelle, H. H. Williams, and my hired hand; found them in good health and spirits; slept in the same house with them, but a miserable place it was." In the same diary two days, later, Colonel May recorded that he and his party arrived in Pittsburgh, which he described as a village of "150 houses, mostly built of logs." The entry for May 12 is as follows: "Colonel Battelle has recovered his health, and is the heartiest man amongst us." The party remained in Pittsburgh for conferences and also for transportation until May 24, and on that day Colonel May wrtoe: "At 121/2 o'clock cast off our fasts, and committed ourselves to the current of the Ohio." Two days later, May 26, 1788, the diary recorded: "I intend in some future page to give a description of the Ohio, as I have made several observations which cannot be conviently put down here... We are passing one lovely island after another, floating, tranquilly, but majestically, at the rate of four and one-half miles per hour. Thus we moved on constantly espying new wonders and beauties, until 3 o'clock when we arrived safely on the banks of the delightful Muskingum.

 

On Col. Battelle as agent for shareholders in the Ohio Company: On August 14, 1788, he attended a meeting of the Ohio Company, representing thrity-six shares, and again on December 3, at which meeting he was appointed to a committee for the leasing of the public squares. At a meeting of the agents, March 2, 1789, he became a Member of the Committee for the administration of the Donation lands, and on May 2 was appointed to the Committee for ascertaining the fees for recording of certificates of permission to occupy and clear city lots.

 

In the Belpre settlement: Coronel Battelle's land was situated opposite to Backus (Blennerhassett) Island, adjoining that of Nathan Cushing. The two men began erecting their houses in close proximity to each other for purposes of safety in the event of an Indian attack. This was a wise decision as was demonstrated in 1791 when the Indian raids began. The two houses became the nucelus of the stockade to which the settlers of the outlying lands came for refuge for the duration of the war.

 

On his leadership: It was during the war period that Colonel Battelle's many qualities of leadership, other than military, were recognized by the entire colony. Being the scholar and religious man that he was, he helped provide for education and instruction of the community's children, and became spiritual leader as well, providing for an conducting regular religious services. His contributions to the moral of the thirty families were immeasureable.

 

On the move to Newport; In 1802, Colonel Battelle's work as an agent for the Ohio company had come to an end. He and his third son, Ebenezer Jr., moved to the Upper Newport township settlement which his son had purchased in 1801.

 

Notes for Nancy Anna Durant:

Painting of Ann Durant Battelle

Provenance/Ownership History: The artist; commissioned by Cornelius Battelle, the sitter's son; to Mrs. Michael Smith, his sister; to Louisa and Elizabeth Smith, her daughters; to Harriet Smith Tolman, Boston, the latter's daughter and great- granddaughter of the sitter; to MFA, 1923, gift of Harriet Smith Tolman.

 

From Campus Martius Library family files.

Groton Mass.

14 July 1914

Dear W. Dana -

        I am in my leisure moments collecting data of portraits painted by Gilbert Stuart and a few day ago I came across an item in the New England Hist. General Registry of 1866 to the effect that the Marietta Historical Society had then recently acquired a photograph of a portrait of "Mrs. Col. Battelle" painted by Stuart "about 1790." Upon further investigation I find that his must be a picture of Mrs. Ebenezer Battelle whose husband was one of the early Marietta Settlers. later moving to the home of his son Ebenezer at Newport, Washington Co., O. where he died in 1815. Mrs. Battelle was Anna Durant of Boston and I find nothing about her after moving to Ohio except that she was "buried at sea," probably on her way to or from Boston, but I have no dates of her death.

        What I am anxious to find out is who has the original portrait and if it will be possible to obtain a photograph of it. Is Battelle a name familiar to you in Marietta or its vicinity or do you know anyone in Newport to whom I could write for his information. The date on the photograph "about 1790" in the Marietta Historical Society is probably wrong. Stuart left this country in 1775 fro England when he was twenty years old and did not return until 1793. From that date until 1795 he was in New York and from 1795 to 1803 he was in Philadelphia. From 1803 to 1805 he was in Washington and from1805 until his death in 1828 he was in Boston. Of Course Mrs. Battelle may have had her portrait painted in New York , Phila., or Washington, but as she was a Boston woman it seems to me more likely that Stuart painted her in Boston when she was on a visit to her native town. That is after 1805.

        The photograph may say who owned the original in 1866 or the records of the society may give the name of the donor of the photo. I don't want to put you to any inconvenience in this matter and there is no hurry about it, but perhaps some time when go of to the society's rooms you would not mind making some inquiries about the photograph.

        I hope everything is going well with you. Have Mrs. Dana and your daughter come home? How is the Bancroft diary progressing. If the travelers have returned please remember me most kindly to them. We have a daughter named Eleanor, five weeks old yesterday. She and Mrs. Park are both getting on splendidly -

With Kind Regards,

Sincerely,

Mr. Lawrence Park

 

Ebenezer Battelle Jr. Letter to sister, Nancy Smith

About 1800 Mrs. Battelle and four children returned to Boston, leaving Ebenezer, Jr. and his father in Ohio.

 

More About Nancy Anna Durant:

Burial: Buried at Sea

 

More About Ebenezer Battelle and Nancy Durant:

Marriage: 07 Jun 1775, Boston MA

       

Children of Ebenezer Battelle and Nancy Durant are:

        2                 i.    Cornelius2 Battelle, born 1776.

+      3                ii.    Ebenezer Battelle, born 08 Sep 1778 in Dedham, Mass; died 02 Jan 1876 in Newport Cemetery.

        4               iii.    Thomas Battelle, born 1780; died 1867.  He married Anne Louis in St. Croix.

 

More About Thomas Battelle and Anne Louis:

Marriage: St. Croix

 

+      5               iv.    Anna Nancy Battelle, born 18 Mar 1783 in Boston; died 26 Oct 1863.

        6                v.    Louisa Battelle, born 22 Mar 1786 in Boston; died 13 Apr 1875.  She married Rev. Joseph Ives Foote.

 

Notes for Louisa Battelle:

Taken from the History of Washington County by H Z Williams

pg 575

The "wheel within a wheel," the Sabbath-school within the church has wrought a glorious work. The school was started in Newport by Mr. Everett and Miss Louisa Battelle, Now Mrs. Foote. Those two were on a visit from Massachusetts, and siezing the opportunity organized the school and succeeded in awakening an interest that continues to the present day.

 

        7               vi.    Arthur Sinclair Battelle, born 1789; died 1789 in Infancy.

        8              vii.    Child Battelle, born 1790; died in Infancy.

        9             viii.    Child Battelle, born 1791; died in Infancy.

 

 

Generation No. 2

 

        3.  Ebenezer2 Battelle (Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 08 Sep 1778 in Dedham, Mass, and died 02 Jan 1876 in Newport Cemetery.  He married Mary Greene 10 Sep 1800 in Newport, OH, daughter of John Greene and Mary Greene.  She was born 02 Sep 1778 in Warwick RI, and died 24 Jul 1871 in Newport Cemetery.

 

Notes for Ebenezer Battelle:

Removed to Marietta, Ohio, with his father in May 1788. After his marriage to Mary Greene he set up housekeeping in Belpre, Ohio, but removed to Newport, Ohio, in 1804, where they remained until their deaths. Correspondence mentions this family as "people of intellect, high respectability, and means."

++++++++++++

Taken from: Washington County and The early settlements of Ohio: Being the Centennial Historical Address before the Citizens of Washington County. 1877

        "An Agricultural Society was formed in 1819, April 28th, styled "The Agricultural and Manufacturing Society of Washington and Wood Counties." The first meeting for the choice of officers was appointed for November 10th, and Ephraim Cutler, Joseph Barker, and Alexander Henderson were appointed to issue an address to the people of the two counties. The meeting was held at the court-house, but was adjourned to the 17th, at the academy. At this adjourned meeting, of which Paul Fearing was Charman and Dr. S. P. Hildreth clerk, the following officers were chosen; Benjamin I. Gilman, president; Christian Schultz, 1st vice-president; Wm. R. Putnam, 2nd vice-president; S. P. Hildreth, recording secretary; Nathan Ward, corresponding secretary; David Putnam, treasurer. The board of managers consisted of the president and vice-president, ex-officio, with Ebenezer Battelle, George Neale, John Griffith, Ephraim Cutler, J. B. Regnier, Benjamin Dana, A. W. Putnam, Paul Fearing, A. Henderson.

Elected County Commissioner 1832 - 3 year term

+++++++++

George J. Blazier, West Virginia History, Charleston WV, Vol. 15, No. 3, April 1954

Ebenezer Battelle Jr. purchased land in present day Newport in 1801. He became one of the leading men in Newport settlement. His wife was Mary Greene, daughter of John Greene, one of the early settlers of that community. They were parents of five sons and one daughter. In 1839, Ebenezer and his youngest son, Andrew, laid  out the village site of present day Newport of which the Battelle home, erected soon after 1802, was the center.

+++++++++

Taken from a speech give by Miss M. Ethel Hays at the Newport Methodist Church on 10/5/1952;

"It was a short time after Rev. Hamilton first came to Newport [1866] that Centenary Chapel, our present church, was planned. No record is given for the selection of Centenary Chapel as the name of the new church. The minutes of the Quarterly conference on Nov, 1866, list the following people elected as a Building Committee: Ebenezer Battelle, Sr., E. A. Jones, Henry O'Blenness, Aaron Edgel, and John Vorley."

++++++++++

1860 Newport Ohio Washington Co

Ebenezer Battelle 83 Mass

Mary 82 RI

 

1870 Washington Co Newport Oh

Ebenezer Battelle Sr 92 Mass Invalid

Mary 92 RI Invalid

+++++++++++

First American West: The Ohio River Valley 1750-1820 (Library of Congress web site)

Mr Battelle made cheese for market sells at 12 to 15 cents per pound

+++++++++++

1818 Battelle & Kimball partnership dissolved - Andrews p 246

+++++++++

Fom "Memories of our Block" (brown Notebook) Carrie Eells Mooney

The Battelles

The Battelles had a grand big house and yard adjoining the lot where grandfather's walled garden had been. There were pear trees, plum trees, cherry trees and a long grape arbor; a vegetable garden, and a grand big barn with hay mow full of sweet smelling hay, where the children rolled and tumbled and played. "I spy"; bins for corn and feed of all kinds for the stock where the children loved to hide; a large cow barn with a whirling cock ornamenting the weather vane atop the little cupola; a carpenter shop with chopping block, saw horse, as well as tools of all kinds. This wonderful yard was a regular paradise for all children on the block.

        There were six little Battelles when I was young. In the early summer when the pink and white cherries were ripe, the tall trees were as full of children as blackbirds, each trying to outstrip the other in stripping the trees of their luscious fruit. The pits were carefully preserved by the girls who scratched their fingers to the bone grinding the cherry pits on a stone to make tiny links for a necklace that was seldom finished before the cherries were gone.

        Before the sun was well up on warm summer mornings the ground under the fruit trees was carefully investigated by the neighborhood children. The earliest riser caught the windfalls. Seldom was a full bunch of grapes left to ripen on the vines. As soon as a grape showed the first flush of purple, it was promptly eaten by an impatient young one.

        Adjoining the carpenter shop was "a little house of great importance." A sturdy Virginia creeper twined its branches protectingly over the arbor, screening the entrance. "The little house of great importance" was big and roomy and could accommodate children of all ages and all sizes. As many as wished could find shelter and relief within its cool, dark interior at one time. There children were wont to whisper their deepest secrets, settle quarrels and hatch mischief.

        A small venturesome boy whose name I dare no mention, one day conceived the idea of measuring the size of his head. He tried first one hole and then another until he found one that fitted his head so tightly that he could not free himself.

        There was great excitement on the block. Mothers came from all corners to find our what the commotion was all about. There was talk of getting our the Fire Department. Someone suggested sawing a board loose, but the mother of the screaming young one was afraid that they would saw his ears off. After much argument on the part of the women, a practical mother solved the problem by advising them to grease the boy's head, and grease it they did. Out popped the poor little head, none the worse for his curiosity but he was a sadder and wiser child. His punishment was "sufficient unto the day there of."


 

From family files at Campus Martius Museum

To Mrs. Nancy Smith (1)                                                                        From: Ebenezer Battelle (2)

c/o Misters McLennon & Chadwick                                                       Newport Ohio

Boston

5th Jan 1823

Dear Sister,

Your esteem'd favour of Oct. 17 is now before me, and is the more interesting from its containing several perticulars of your family, of which we often think and speak with pleasure, It wou'd indeed make us vary happy cou'd I, with a part, or all our family pass an evening with you but for the present, except for you all our best wishes and affection.  My family have now become more dear to me than ever, tho' Mrs. Battelle's(3) health is not so firm as I cou'd wish, to manage so numerous a family, five besides our own, that is a prentis Boy and Girl, two Boarders for school and their Instructor. C. D, Battelle(4) has nearly attain'd his growth, and injoys better health this winter, than he has for some years past, with Phebe(5) and Thomas(6), he is much ingaged in school, their studies are various and have the best help. We think they get along very well, our other three boys(7) bid fair to do well, A. B. Battelle(7) is the most promising child I ever saw; in our family, they are all active and busy. My oldests help me much, but the very low price of the produce of my farm renders it hard to pay debts contracted in better times, but I do not wish to complain, I have never yet been distressed and perhaps may not be, the present times teach us economy and learn us to value the blessing of heaven with which we are surounded, which otherwise might have pass'd unnoticed. I highly approve of your changing your maner of living and think your present must be far the most agreeable situation. Mention me with respect to our Dedham friends. I am much pleased to hear from them. Offer my respects to Mr. Brimmer and Cousin Jane Tolman. Say to Mr. B I have receiv'd many useful hints from the Agricultural work he sent me, and if he can forward me another volum on the same subject, it will be well receiv'd, and preserv'd for his Name's Sake In your inquiry for Mrs. Larkin I conclude you meant Leakin I must refer you to our sister who saw her when here and had a message to her friends, Louisa no doubt may recolect seeing her at Dana's Mills, Mrs. Leakin and family removed, about nine months since to Baton Rouge on the Missippia I know but little of them since, but understand they are not pleased with their situation, as she is little less than 2,000 miles from this I cannot conveniently see her. I beg you would offer no excuse for what renders your letter pleasent by being perticular in what conserns yourself and family, as that is always interesting to me, It is some time since the above was writen, I expected Phebe to add a postscrip, but she has been writing to her Aunt Louisa, and (poor child) has not for the last month had a moments leisure, I'shou'd have fill'd my paper but my many cares through the week has cause'd me to omit closing this 'til Sunday morning 26th Jan. but now I expect every moment to here the horse and the mail will be soon close'd, Love to Sister Louisa and our Cousins Maynard from your

Affectionate Brother

Eben Battelle

 

1. Anna (Nancy) Battelle, b. 18 March 1783, Boston, m. Michael Smith of Boston. d. 26 Oct 1863

2. Ebenezer Battelle, b. 8 August 1778, Dedham, MA,

d. 2 Jan 1876, Newport, Ohio

3. Mrs. Battelle was Mary Greene, dau. of John and Mary Greene, b. 2 Sept 1778, Warwick, R.I., m. 10 Sept 1 1800, Newport, Ohio to Ebenezer Battelle. She d. 24 July 1871, Newport, Ohio.

4. C. D. Battelle, b. 13 July 1807, Belpre, Ohio, son of Ebenezer and Mary (Greene) Battelle m. 13 July 1829 Elizabeth Greenwood. (Rev. Cornelius Durant Battelle)

5. Phebe Greene Battelle, b. 20 Apr 1809, Newport, Ohio; d. 13 Sept 1841; m. 13 Feb. 1834, Rev. Wesley Browning.

6. Thomas Smith Battelle, b. 20 August 1812, Newport, Ohio. Married (1) Grace Ann Fleming; (2) Louisa Anderson; (3) Sue L. Bailey; (4) Almira Brown. d. in California, 26 Nov 1892.

7. Other three boys:

Gordon Battelle (Rev.) b. 14 Nov 1814, Newport, Ohio; d. 7 August 1862, Washington, D.C.; m. 12 Oct l Somerset, Ohio to Mary Louisa Tucker.

Ebenezer Battelle, b. 22 May 1817, Newport, Ohio; d. 7 Dec 1892, Loveland, Ohio in. 28 April 1841, Lower Newport, Ohio, Julia Putnam Barker, dau. of Joseph Barker, Jr. and Melissa Wilson Stone.

Andrew Brimmer Battelle, b. 26 Sent 1820, Newport, Ohio; d. 30 Apr 1887, Bellaire, 0. m. 23 Dec. 1847, Lower Newport, 0hio. to Elizabeth Mary Barker, dau. of Joseph Barker, Jr. and Melissa Wilson Stone.

8. Louisa Battelle, b. 22 March 1786, Boston, d. 13 April 1875; in. Rev. Joseph Ives Foote.

Notes 1, 2 and 8 were children of Ebenezer Battelle, Sr. and Anna Hunt Durant, who came to Washington County in l789 with their five children, About 1800 Mrs. Battelle, and four children returned to Boston, leaving Ebenezer, Jr. and his father in Ohio.

Capt. Ebenezer and Mary Greene Battelle and the beginning of the Temperance Movement.

 

Temperance reform may be said to have had its origin in Washington County early in 1828. A number of good Methodist were assembled some time during that year at a quarterly meeting held at Ebenezer Battelle's in Newport, which was one of the best settlements in that part of the county. Any host or hostess, who did not offer his or her guest liquor, in those days, was regarded as inhospitable, mean and niggardly. On this occasion the liquor happened to be a most excellent and powerful article of peach brandy. The little company, among who were several church dignitaries, drank their brandy to the health of Deacon Battelle, and followed with a health to some minister who was present. They drank copious draughts from large glasses, refilled from am great decanter, which was passed around with such rapidly increasing frequency that it had in turn soon to be refilled from the cask. The party became more merry, and with the recklessness born of incipient intoxication, drank oftener than before. All this was while Mrs. Battelle was making ready a substantial dinner for the assembled brethren, When dinner was announced they took one drink more and at the table another. And now the effects of the potations began to appear. Several of the pious brothers who sat down to partake of the steaming dinner were unable to eat, and left the table. Nearly all were visibly affected by the liquor, and several were decidedly drunk. Only a few being able to attend the meeting which had been arranged for in the afternoon, it was postponed. All were ashamed of there over-indulgence, but Mrs. Battelle was sorrowful and indignant. She was a woman of fine sensibilities, great strength of character, and deep convictions. Seeing clearly the great evil to which the use of liquor led, and that it was a reproach to the cause of religion, she resolved that nevermore should the temptation be placed before her guests. Her husband agreed with her, and the next day, in meeting, speaking sorrowfully of what had occurred, expressed his conviction that the custom of drinking was unbecoming to a Christian people, and made known the decision that had been arrived at rewarding the banishment of liquor from his board. The sentiment was endorsed by nearly all or perhaps quite all of the people present, many of whom were smarting under their influence with others to do the same. There was much earnest talk upon the subject, and feeling of meeting adjourned, but each man, going to his home, carried with him the determination to so all in his power to promote that principle of total abstinence among the people in his neighborhood.

History of Washington County, H. Z. Williams, pgs. 444 -445

 

 

 

More About Ebenezer Battelle:

Date born 2: 06 Aug 1778, Dedham, Mass

Died 2: 02 Jan 1876, Newport, Ohio

Burial 2: Newport, Ohio

Geneology book # 1: Greene -   468

Geneology book # 2: Greene - 015 - Gen2

Military service: Captain.

Occupation: Farmer

 

Notes for Mary Greene:

 

 

 

 

 

More About Ebenezer Battelle and Mary Greene:

Marriage: 10 Sep 1800, Newport, OH

       

Children of Ebenezer Battelle and Mary Greene are:

        10               i.    Cornelius Durant3 Battelle, born 26 Sep 1801; died in infancy.

        11              ii.    Mary Ann Battelle, born 31 Jan 1803; died in infancy.

        12             iii.    Mary Ann Battelle, born 09 Feb 1804; died in infancy.

+      13             iv.    Rev Cornelius Durant Battelle, born 13 Jul 1807 in Washington  Co., Ohio; died 02 Jul 1897 in Columbus Ohio.

        14              v.    Phebe Greene Battelle, born 20 Apr 1809 in Newport, Washington Co., Ohio; died 15 Sep 1841 in St Louis MO.  She married REV Wesley Browning 13 Feb 1834 in Washington Co OH; born 15 Aug 1795 in Montgonery Co MD; died 06 Nov 1888 in Rinkelville Mo.

 

Notes for Phebe Greene Battelle:

She was a missionary amoungst the indians and was considered very sucessful. She had no children

Marietta Intellingencer September 30, 1841

Died in St. Louis, on the 15th inst. after a short illness, Mrs. Phebe G. Browning, wife of Rev. Wesley Brwoning, and only daughter of Ebenezer Battelle, Esq., of Newport, Ohio, aged 32 years.

 

More About Phebe Greene Battelle:

Date born 2: 20 Apr 1809, Newport, Ohio

Geneology book # 1: Greene -  543

Geneology book # 2: Greene - 072 - Gen3

Misc: Had no children.

 

Notes for REV Wesley Browning:

The Methodist Episcopal Church was organized one mile South of Brownsville in 1833 and services were held at the Frank Linn home. His home was known as Linn's Appointment, being one of twenty-one appointments of the Woodsfield circuit. They built a log meeting house in 1834 when Wesley Browning was the presiding elder. The first preachers were R. Armstrong, H. Bradshaw, C. D. Battelle, G. Smith,

 

1860 Missouri St Louis Central Twp

Westly Browning 64 Md Met. E. Clergyman

Phebe 40 NY

Phebe 14 Ind

Fletcher 7 Mo

John J 3 Mo

 

1870 Missouri St Louis Central Twp

Westly Browning 74 minister

Phebe 49 NY

Phebe A 23

Fletcher 16 MO

John J 16 Mo

 

Taken from the Minutes of the Annual Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for the year 1889, Nashville, Tenn

               Wesley Browning was born in Montgomery County, Md., August 15, 1895; died at Rinkelville, Mo., Tuesday, November 6, 1888, aged ninety-three. His father a local preacher, his mother one of the excellent of the earth, in early childhood his religious convictions became strong and deep. About the year 1811, the family removed to Chillicothe, O., where during a revival Brother Browning was converted, April 1, 1820.

               It is probable that up to this time his educational advantages had been of the most meager character, but now, under the mighty hand of God pressing upon heart and conscience, indicating a call to wider usefulness, he sought for books and became an ardent student. In 1822 he was appointed class leader and soon after became an exhorter. In 1824, he received license to preach, and traveled a circuit as supply for two years, when he was admitted on trial by the Ohio Conference. At the end of four years he was transferred to the Pittsburgh Conference, filling important positions till 1839, when he was transferred to the Missouri Conference and stationed at First Church, St. Louis.

               Laboring in the pastorate and presiding eldership in 1845, he was appointed to take charge of the Chickasaw Academy, in the Indian Mission Conference, where, in labors more abundant, he spent five years. In 1851 he returned to Missouri and was again in charge for the St. Louis District as presiding elder. From this to the end of his life he remained a member of our Conference.

               As a preacher Father Browning was strong, scriptural, and spiritual. He wielded the sword of the Spirit with a power begotten of communion with God., living much upon his knees. He brought out of the closet into the pulpit not only a face radiant, as having, Moses-like, met God, but a heart of love, a tongue of fire. The baptism of the Holy Ghost was upon him; hence his ministry was not in word only, but in power. He had much to be coveted gift of expounding the Word. Especially in his later years his pulpit efforts were singularly successful in the edification of believers. Out of his own rich experience of God, as revealed in Christ by Divine Spirit to his own heart and spirit, he had the power to unlock the treasures of the Sacred Book and expound the mysteries of our holy religion. In his prayer he was unusually powerful. If his prayers did not bring heaven down to us, they did lift us heavenward. As a prince, he had power with God and prevailed. Congregations and preachers were often melted into tenderness, wept and rejoiced, as he rose on the wings of faith and prayer, and glory crowned the mercy-seat.

               The character of Father Browning was strong and unique - strength in repose, however, rather than in action. He stood four-square to every wind that blew, his attitude expressed by the language of the apostle as surveying the solid phalanx of the world, the flesh , and the devil. "None of these things move me." He was deeply spiritual, always devout; his piety, far removed from asceticism, was of a cheerful and hopeful type. Charitable in his attitude to and judgment of his fellowmen, he spake evil of no men; an Israelite indeed in whom there was no guile, he was open as the day. Socially old and young alike felt the genial influence of his bright and cheering presence.

               He grew old gracefully; nothing of the querulous characterized him. Father Browning lived on the threshold of eternity; in the world, but not of the world, "his conversation was in heaven." The very atmosphere about him seemed penetrated with the fragrance of Holiness. He needed not to make profession of purity; the light kindled in him shone effulgently. We took knowledge of him that he had been with Christ, drank into his spirit, and , in a measure, reproduced his life.

               His sun went down without a cloud. With Father Browning at even-tide it was light. For the coming of the messenger he had waited long. Simeon-like, he could say: "Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace." His eyes had seen, his heart rejoiced in, and his soul enjoyed the blessing of full salvation. The day before his death he sent be Brother Aspley his last message to the brethren whom he loved: "Tell them to preach Christ and a full salvation." Early in the morning of November 6th his rapturous spirit rejoiced in the prospect of the coming day, and he went down into the valley shouting victory through the blood of the Lamb. Doubtless there was ministered unto him an abundant entrance into the everlasting kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. He has gone from us, joined the brotherhood of the immortal in the Celestial City. he lives with God; he also lives in our memories and is enshrined in our hearts. May we follow him as he followed Christ.

              

 

More About Wesley Browning and Phebe Battelle:

Marriage: 13 Feb 1834, Washington Co OH

 

+      15             vi.    Thomas Smith Battelle, born 20 Aug 1812 in Newport Ohio.

+      16            vii.    Rev. Gordon Battelle, born 14 Nov 1814 in Newport Ohio; died 07 Aug 1862 in Washington D.C..

+      17           viii.    Capt. Ebenezer Jr Battelle, born 22 May 1817 in Newport Ohio; died 1889.

+      18             ix.    Andrew Brimmer Battelle, born 26 Sep 1820 in Newport, Ohio; died 30 Apr 1887 in Bellaire, Ohio..

 

 

        5.  Anna Nancy2 Battelle (Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 18 Mar 1783 in Boston, and died 26 Oct 1863.  She married Michael Smith. 

       

Children of Anna Battelle and Michael Smith are:

        19               i.    Louisa3 Smith.

        20              ii.    Elizabeth Smith.


 

Generation No. 3

 

        13.  Rev Cornelius Durant3 Battelle (Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 13 Jul 1807 in Washington  Co., Ohio, and died 02 Jul 1897 in Columbus Ohio.  He married (1) Elizabeth Greenwood 13 Jul 1829 in Newport, OH.  She was born 12 Dec 1811 in Morgantown (WV), and died 1856.  He married (2) Martha Guthrie 26 Nov 1856 in Wheeling (WV).  She was born 27 Jan 1825 in PA, and died 28 Aug 1908.

 

Notes for Rev Cornelius Durant Battelle:

The Methodist Episcopal Church was organized one mile South of Brownsville in 1833 and services were held at the Frank Linn home. His home was known as Linn's Appointment, being one of twenty-one appointments of the Woodsfield circuit. They built a log meeting house in 1834 when Wesley Browning was the presiding elder. The first preachers were R. Armstrong, H. Bradshaw, C. D. Battelle, G. Smith,

 

The First United Methodist Church, also known as the First Methodist Episcopal Church, was the first church to be established in Bellaire in 1839.  The Reverend C.D. Battelle, a circuit rider preacher, held services every two weeks.

 

Wesley M. E. Church.

The Industrial town of Ritchietown, where Wesley was first organized, became a part of Wheeling on February 3, 1871. Ritchietown did not support a Newspaper and for that reason news items of that early date are very scarce.

On July 22, 1850, Reverend William Summers and the Presiding Elder, Reverend T. M. Judson purchased, through the Merchants and Mechanics Bank which is now the National Exchange Bank of Wheeling, Lots 3 and 4 in Square 25 for the purpose of erecting a House of Worship. A substantial one story brick building was erected and dedicated one year later by Reverend Cornelius Battelle and Dr. James M. Drummond, the Pastor. The first Trustees were James M. Wheate, William Montgomery, James Flowers, Joseph Pedley, Henry Otte, Abner Charnock, James Robinson and Joseph Woods. The Sunday School was organized in the very beginning with Prof. White as Superintendent, James Wheate, Assistant Superintendent, Joseph Woods, Treasurer, Joseph Norton, Secretary and John Parks the Librarian. The pupils numbered 100.

 

In another note about the Wesley M. E. Church: This church is situated on Jacob street in South Wheeling and was organized in 1850. William Montgomery, Joseph Woods and Henry Ohley were

the original trustee. They erected a small brick building and it was dedicated by Rev. Cornelius Battelle in 1851. The old church becoming too small for the growing congregation, a new building was erected on the old site. It is now in a thriving condition. It has a large and flourishing Sabbath-school.

 

1860 Indiana Monroe Co Bloomington Twp

C D Battelle 52 OH Methodist Minister

M G 34 OH

Lizza 13 OH

 

In the 1860's, it so happened that the General Conference met at Washington Court House that fall and [the Circleville church] sent word over that they wanted the conference to send them a man of weight and experience, and to clinch the matter, they sent a committee to explain [their problems]. The Bishop assured them they should have just such a man as they asked for and they came home well pleased. When the appointments were published in the paper, every one wanted to know who was coming to Circleville. `Rev. C. D. Battelle, Circleville,' was the announcement. Who was he? No one knew him. The first Sunday he was to preach, the church was crowded to see the new minister. When he made his appearance, the members were fully satisfied that the conference had filled the bill. He was a man that would weigh nearly 300 pounds, his hair was quite gray and he had been preaching over 50 years (he was a man of weight, age and experience surely). The first impression was not favorable, but when the year was up he had church matters all settled up and everything was going on lovingly and harmoniously.

 

 

1880 census 5th ward Zanesville, Muskingum Co

C. D Battelle 72 OH Methodist Minister father b MA, mother b. MA

Martha 53 OH father b PA, mother b. PA

 

Taken from the Minutes of the Eighty-sixth Session of the Ohio Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Chuth held in Washingotn C. H., Ohio, September 29 - October 4, 1897. Edited by the Secretary; Adopted by the Conference as its Official Record. Pub. Columbus : Press of Spahr & Glenn, 1897

Cornelius D. Battelle was born July 13, 1807, in Washington County, O., near where the town of Belpre now stands, Six children were born to Ebenezer and Mary Battelle, of whom Cornelius was the first, and who outlived all the rest of the family. His boyhood and youth were spent in the county, except while at school in Marietta Academy.

The Methodist Episcopal Church became his church home, October 30, 1825. He began at once to take an active part in religious services, but did not receive a change of heart until about six months later.

After serving as class leader about seven years, he was licensed to preach by Rev. David C. Merriman, and admitted into the Pittsburgh Conference in 1833. His Pastoral charges were Woodsfield Circuit in 1833; Barnesville, 1834; Moorfield, 1835; St. Clarisville, 1836; Cadiz, 1837; St. Clarisville again, 1838; Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, 1839-40; Uniontown, 1841-42; Uniontown District, 1843-44-; Steubenville, 1845-46; Wheeling Distinct, 1847-49; North Street Wheeling, 1850-51;Superintendent of Western Seamen's Freind Society, 1852-54; Moundsville, 1855; Covington, Kentucky Conference, 1856-57; Bloomington, Indiana Conference, 1858-89; Wesley Chapel, Indianapolis, 1960-61; Walnut Street, Chilicothe, Ohio Conference, Ohio Conference, 1862; Marietta, 1863-65; Seventh Street Zanesville, 1866-68; London, 1869-70; Circleville, 1871-72; Marietta, again, 1873-74; Gallipolis, 1875-76; Logan, 1877-78; South Street, Zanesville, 1879-81. He retired from the pastorate in 1882.

It will be seen from the above appointments, that he was five years on circuits, five years on districts and thirty-eight years stations. The sixteen years of his non pastorate ministry, in the early part of which he frequently preached, added to the forty-eight years before mentioned, make a remarkable ministerial history of sixty-four years.

It will also be noticed that he was a member of five Annual Conferences. He began in the Pittsburgh conference, on territory which later became a part of the West Virginia Conference. While pastor at Moundsville, Bishop Simpson told him that he was needed in Covington, Ky., and at the end of the time limit there, Bishop Morris said to him that Bloomington, Ind., needed a man of his qualities and experience. These transfers were not of his own seeking, but were cheerfully accepted, regarding the voice of the church as the voice of God. While in Indianapolis, Bishop Ames, whose home was in that city. suggested that it might be pleasant for him to go back and spend the balance of his years in the Ohio Conference, then embracing the territory from which he started; hence his transfer to this conference.

Mr. Battelle's religious experience was of the clear, positive type. Soundly converted himself, he always insisted upon the knowledge sins forgiven, and the witness of God's Spirit to adoption, as the birth-right of every child of God. He thought and read much upon the Doctrine of Christian Perfection, and became an earnest seeker of this blessed experience. But it was not until he had been in the ministry thirty-five years, that he came into possession of perfect love. The evidence of entire sanctification, to him was as satisfactory as was that of regeneration. His preaching after that gave no uncertain sound on this subject.

Mr. Battelle was an able preacher of the Gospel. He knew more about the Bible than any other book. To him it was the Book of books. Quotations from the Scriptures entered very largely into his discourses. He seldom wrote, and never read his sermons.  Favored with a good memory, he did not often need to use even brief notes in the pulpit. This power of extemporaneous speech was greatly to his advantage. Possessing lungs of great compass, "he lifted up his voice and spared not;" his words were "in demonstration of the Spirit and of power," and often were attended with immediate results. His powerful discoursed and evangelistic force made him in great demand at revival-meetings in other fields of labor, and more especially at camp-meetings. Perhaps no preacher in the Ohio Conference had taken such a leading part in so many camp-meetings as Mr. Battelle.

But few men were more gifted and powerful in prayer. He talked with God as one who knew Him.  His generalship in the conduct of prayer, revival, and camp-meetings, had much to do with his success. He knew how to organize and move the militant forced of the church to achieve the greatest results. He was always found at the front.

In presence, he was commanding. His portly and manly form, together with his senatorian voice and earnest manner, made him a remarkable man among men.

Our honored brother was always held in the highest esteem by his ministerial associates in the Ohio Conference, of which he was the senior member for six years, or since the death of Dr. J. M. Trimble.

Mr. Battelle was twice married, Before the became an itinerant preacher, July 13, 1829, Miss Elizabeth Greenwood became his wife, To them were born six children, three of whom are living. This wife and mother shared with him the privations and toils incident to the Methodist Itinerancy in those days, until early in 1856, when she passed to her reward.

November 26, 1856, He was married to Miss Martha Guthrie, who during twenty-six years of his active life, was a faithful and true helpmeet, and who during these long and weary years of superannuation, was all that a true wife could be to our dear brother. But for her constant attention and happy cheerful disposition, there might have been much of gloom and darkness, instead of perpetual sunshine.

After enduring patiently for many months the affliction incident to blindness, deafness and comparative helplessness, in the twilight of the evening of July 2nd, 1897 his great soul passed suddenly, but peacefully to rest. He lacked but 11 days of 90 years.

Thus has ended  the eventful and useful life of the oldest minister of five conferences with which he was connected. For sixty-four years it was said at each Annual Conference, "There is nothing against Brother Battelle."                    W. C. Holliday

 

More About Rev Cornelius Durant Battelle:

Name 2: Cornelius Battelle

Name 3: Cornelius D. Battelle

Burial: Greenlawn Cemetery Columbus Ohio

Geneology book # 1: Greene -  540

Geneology book # 2: Greene - 068 - Gen3

Occupation 1: Methodist Minister

Occupation 2: Reverend. A M.E. Preacher.

Physical Description: A very large man.

 

More About Cornelius Battelle and Elizabeth Greenwood:

Marriage: 13 Jul 1829, Newport, OH

 

More About Martha Guthrie:

Burial: Greenlawn Cemetery Columbus Ohio

 

More About Cornelius Battelle and Martha Guthrie:

Marriage: 26 Nov 1856, Wheeling (WV)

       

Children of Cornelius Battelle and Elizabeth Greenwood are:

+      21               i.    Alpheus Monroe4 Battelle, born 24 Apr 1830 in Virginia; died Bet. 1900 - 1910 in Kansas Brown Co Hiawatha twp.

        22              ii.    Son Battelle, born Feb 1832; died Feb 1832.

+      23             iii.    William Greenwood Battelle, born 15 Dec 1835; died 02 Mar 1869 in Wheeling WV.

+      24             iv.    Amelia Gordonia Battelle, born 19 Oct 1840.

+      25              v.    Elizabeth Amanda Battelle, born 17 Dec 1847 in Ohio; died Aft. 1920.

        26             vi.    Amelia B. Battelle.

 

More About Amelia B. Battelle:

Geneology book #: Greene -   736

 

 

        15.  Thomas Smith3 Battelle (Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 20 Aug 1812 in Newport Ohio.  He married (1) Grace Ann Flemming 29 Aug 1833 in Uniontown PA.  She was born 14 Jul 1810 in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and died 19 Jun 1849 in Muscatine Iowa.  He married (2) Louisa Anderson 07 Mar 1850 in Muscatine Iowa.  She was born 01 Sep 1812, and died 26 Oct 1870 in Sierra Valley CA.  He married (3) Sue L (Bailey) West 24 Apr 1873 in Reno Nev.  She was born Sep 1832 in Onondaga NY, and died 20 Nov 1883 in Sierra Valley CA.  He married (4) Almira Brown 25 Dec 1885 in Los Angeles CA.  She was born 28 Jun 1814 in Columbia NY.

 

Notes for Thomas Smith Battelle:

Battelle, T. S. — of Sierra County, Calif. Member of California state assembly 22nd District, 1867-69. Burial location unknown. ???

 T. S. Battelle

======

This is one of the early settlers in the valley. He was born in Washington county, Ohio, August 20, 1812. His father, Ebenezer Battelle, was one of the earliest settlers of that state, and died in his ninety-eighth year. When twenty-two years of age, our subject went to Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and dealt in merchandise for three years. Then he spent another three years in the same business at Clarksburg, Virginia, and several years at Muscatine, boating on the Mississippi. In 1852 he came overland to California, and farmed two years near Marysville. In 1854 he came to the Sierra valley, and located a ranch of 480 acres close to Sierraville, where he has since lived. He was married August 29, 1833, to Grace A. Fleming of Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and she died June 19, 1849. By her he had eight children, three of whom are living. On the first of March, 1850, he was again married, to Louisa Anderson of Pennsylvania, who died October 26, 1870. Mr. Battelle was married a third time, April 25, 1872, to Mrs. S. L. West of Waseca, Minnesota.

Illustrated History of Plumas, Lassen & Sierra Counties, with California from 1513 to 1850. - Fariss and Smith, San Francisco,  1882. p 270

 

Transcribed by Craig Hahn, Nov. 2004

=======

SONS OF TEMPERANCE.

The order of the Sons of Temerance was established in Davenport, on the 5th day of October, 1847, by the organization of Scott Division, No. 1.

 

The organization was effected by a dispensation of the National Division of North America to T. S. Battelle, the then acting Deputy for the State of Iowa.

 

At the institution of this Division, H. Price was elected W. P., and Enos Tichenor, W. A., and operations were commenced in the loft of an old school house, with a membership of eleven.

Scott Co. Iowa

CHAPTER XXXIV, BENEVOLENT ORDERS.

http://www.celticcousins.net/scott/file34.html

======

Hotels.- American House, T.S. Battelle; Iowa House, James Boorland; City Hotel, S.M. Rowell; "Capt. Jim's," James Sumner.

A Glimpse of Iowa in 1846

By John B. Newhall

http://iagenweb.org/history/1846/1846pgs80to89.htm

 

More About Thomas Smith Battelle:

Geneology book # 1: Greene -  545

Geneology book # 2: Greene - 075 - Gen3

Occupation: Farmer

Residence: California

 

More About Thomas Battelle and Grace Flemming:

Marriage: 29 Aug 1833, Uniontown PA

 

More About Thomas Battelle and Louisa Anderson:

Marriage: 07 Mar 1850, Muscatine Iowa

 

More About Thomas Battelle and Sue West:

Marriage: 24 Apr 1873, Reno Nev

 

More About Thomas Battelle and Almira Brown:

Marriage: 25 Dec 1885, Los Angeles CA

       

Children of Thomas Battelle and Grace Flemming are:

+      27               i.    Thorton Fleming4 Battelle, born 26 Nov 1834.

        28              ii.    Mary Louisa Battelle, born 28 May 1836.

 

More About Mary Louisa Battelle:

Name 2: Mary Battelle

Geneology book #: Greene -   746

 

        29             iii.    Albert Augustus Battelle, born 27 Aug 1837.

 

More About Albert Augustus Battelle:

Name 2: Albert Battelle

Geneology book #: Greene -  742

Misc: Died at 21.

 

        30             iv.    Sarah Josephine Battelle, born 29 Jan 1839.

        31              v.    William Henry Battelle, born 21 Oct 1840.

        32             vi.    George Lewellyn Battelle, born 16 Dec 1844.  He married Sarah Ramsey.

 

More About George Lewellyn Battelle:

Name 2: George Battelle

Geneology book #: Greene -  744

 

        33            vii.    Mary Louisa Battelle, born 09 Dec 1846.  She married Benjamin Lemmon.

 

 

        16.  Rev. Gordon3 Battelle (Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 14 Nov 1814 in Newport Ohio, and died 07 Aug 1862 in Washington D.C..  He married (2) Maria Louise Tucker 12 Oct 1842 in Somerset Ohio, daughter of Waldo Tucker and Lydia Jenny.  She was born in Vermont, and died 07 Dec 1889 in Buffalo NY.

 

Notes for Rev. Gordon Battelle:

He was a graduate of Meadville College; Principal of Clarksburg,W.V., Academy; member of the West Virginia Conference of Methodist Episcopal Church for many years; Chaplain 1st Virginia Volunteers, Infantry; Member of the Constitutional Convention,West Virginia; and a prominent Unionist at the outbreak of the War of the Rebellion. Gordon Battelle

 

Taken from a speech give by Miss M. Ethel Hays at the Newport Methodist Church dates about 1960;

"Rev. Gordon Battelle, to whose memory the soldier's Monument was erected and whose statue facing West Virginia, the state for which he had a large part in forming its constitution, was [son-in-law] to Rev Hamilton.

        In 1913, John W. Hamilton had become Bishop Hamilton and he returned to Newport and made the dedicatory address when the Soldiers' Monument was dedicated."

 

BATTELLE, Gordon, clergyman, born in Newport, Ohio, 14 November 1814; died in camp, 7 January 1862. He was graduated at Allegheny College in 1840, and licensed as a Methodist preacher in 1842. From 1843 to 1851 he was principal of the academy at Clarksburg, Virginia During this time he was, in 1847, ordained deacon, and in 1849 elder, in the Methodist Church. As preacher and presiding elder he occupied most of his time from 1851 to 1860, and was a member of the general conference of 1856 and 1860. His influence in western Virginia was very great, and at the beginning of the civil war in 1861 he was appointed an official visitor to the military camps. The needs of the time demanding attention to the political situation, he became a member of the convention that met 24 November 1861, and framed the constitution of the new state of West Virginia. To him, more largely probably than to any other man, was due the abolition of slavery in that region. In November 1861, he was chosen chaplain of the 1st Virginia regiment, and so continued till his death of typhoid fever after a service of but a few weeks.

 

 

Gordon Battelle was a member of the 1861 convention that framed the constitution of the new state of West Virginia — and is credited with being largely responsible for the abolition of slavery in that region.

http://www.battelle.org/solutions/fall04/SpecialReport.stm

 

George J. Blazier, West Virginia History, Charleston WV, Vol. 15, No. 3, April 1954

Gordon Battelle 1814 - 1862 became a leading educator and ultimately a clergyman in the Methodist Church, as well as one of the influential men in the founding of West Virginia. He began his higher education in the early 1830's, at Marietta Collegiate Institute and Western Teachers Seminary. Later in the 1830's, he entered Allegheny College at Meadsville, Pennsylvania, where he was graduated in 1840. One of his fellow students with whom he was later to become associated in the founding of the new state became Governor of the Reorganized State of Virginia. Gordon Battelle became a teacher. His first teaching assignment, in 1842, was the principalship of the newly organized Asbury Academy, founded in Parkersburg by the Parkersburg Academy Association under the sponsorship of the East Ohio Conference of the Methodist Church. A year later, her was called to the principalship of the newly organized Northwestern Virginia Academy, chartered in 1842, at Clarksburg. This Academy was the successor, by virtue of having the same board of Trustees, to the Randolph Academy that had been chartered there in 1787. Here Battelle earned the high reputation as an educator by which he was known for the remainder of his life.

 

Throughout his professional life, Battelle had been closely allied with the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1847, he was ordained to its ministry, while still principal of the Academy. In 1851, he was called to the pastorate of the church in Charleston and after much consideration he resigned as principal and accepted the call. He spent the next four years as a church pastor in Wheeling. In 1855, he was appointed presiding elder of the church's Clarksburg District. While in the eldership, he was selected three times: in 1856, 1859, and 1860, as the regional delegate to the General Conference. In the latter year, he was appointed presiding elder of the Wheeling District.

 

When Battelle accepted the presiding eldership of the Wheeling District, the clouds of conflict between the North and the South were growing darker. His wide acquaintance with the people of the Northern and western section and with the former students of the Northwestern Virginia Academy, and his keen insight into the trends of the political affairs enabled him to write and apeak as few other men could in the closing days of peace. Not only did he speak from public platforms, but he also contributed articles to the Wheeling "Intelligencer." Through his newspaper contributions, Battelle influenced the thinking of his reader against secession (as attested by the votes of the western delegates at the Richmond Convention) , and second, he emphasized that the western section should separate from the lower part of the state. Too, he foresaw the problems that would arise in the formation of  new commonwealth.

 

Battelle's first appointment to the public service came in October, 1861, when Governor Pierpont of the Reorganized State of Virginia appointed him to visit the military camps in the mountain regions of western Virginia: Philippi,, Elkwater, Cheat Mountain, and other points where conditions of insufficient clothing, lack of necessary medical doctors, nurses, and medicines had been reported. He found that the reports were true and i his report made recommendations for relieving the situations. Meanwhile, since the beginning of the War, the agitation for statehood of the people of Western Virginia had been growing in intensity, culmination in the First and Second Wheeling Conventions., May 13 - 15, 1861, and June 11 - 25, and an adjourned session, August 6 - 21. In October, 1861, delegates were elected to a constitutional convention. Gordon Battelle was elected a delegate fro Ohio County. The convention convened on November 26. Battelle submitting for consideration the following three resolutions: one, the provision for "a thorough and efficient system of free schools"; two, a clause providing that "no slave shall be brought into this State fro permanent residence, after this Constitution goes into operation"; and three, a proposal for the gradual abolition of slavery, beginning July 4, 1864. the resolution for education became a part of the constitution, but the slavery clauses were not adopted, being tabled by the insignificant margin of 24 for and 23 against. Great disappointment was expressed throughout he state over the failure to secure the passage of the slavery resolutions.

 

In November, 1861, the same month of the opening of the Constitutional Convention, he enlisted as a chaplain in the 1st (Loyal) Virginia Regiment of Volunteers. Following a furlough in June, 1862, he was transferred from his regiment to make an investigation of sanitary conditions in the military camps encircling Washington. While thus engaged, he was stricken with typhoid fever, and epidemic of which he was then seeking to alleviate and prevent. His premature death at the age of 48 came on August 7, 1862.

 

Battelle was awarded the degree of Master of Arts by Allegheny College in 1843. IN 1861, he was recognized for his outstanding leadership as an educator and clergymen by Ohio University, in an honoring degree of Doctor of Divinity. After his death, Battelle Township of Monongalia County was named in honor of him.

 

One of the many resolutions from various churches: From Upshur County, "Resolved, that in his death we lose a most zealous and able supporter of the doctrine of Holy Christianity and defender of the principles of Methodist Episcopal Church, that we lose a sacrificing patriot, devoted to the cause of our country, the union of the States, the best interest of Western Virginia and the cause of liberty and Humanity everywhere."

 

The Wheeling "Intelligencer" stated editorially, "His pulpit brilliance and spiritual  influence were paralleled by his astuteness. He foresaw that the greatest problem in admitting the Western Territory in those turbulent years...would arise over the question of slavery, particularly in regard to the new state's constitutional interpretation. His determined effort to bring convention action upon the touchy point was his greatest contribution...His influence was potential in preserving Western Virginia from the whirlpool of secession.

 

More About Rev. Gordon Battelle:

Geneology book # 1: Greene -  550

Geneology book # 2: Greene - 079 - Gen3

Military service: Died in the Army.

Occupation: Reverend. A M.E. Preacher.

 

Notes for Maria Louise Tucker:

Died at her daughter's home

 

January 2, 1890

Mrs. Maria L. BATTELLE, widow of the late Rev. Gordon BATTELLE,

died of heart desease at the home of her youngest daugher in

Buffalo, N. Y. Tuesday. 17th inst.  Her remains were brought

to Newport, Washington county, for burial, beside those of her

husband Gordan BATTELLE, who was a native of Newport, and died

in the service of his country in 18?2.  (date unreadable)

Athens Messenger (Athens, Ohio)

 

 

More About Maria Louise Tucker:

Burial: Newport Cemetery

 

More About Gordon Battelle and Maria Tucker:

Marriage: 12 Oct 1842, Somerset Ohio

       

Children of Gordon Battelle and Maria Tucker are:

        34               i.    Mary Louisa4 Battelle, born 30 Sep 1843.  She married Fredrick Atwood.

 

More About Mary Louisa Battelle:

Geneology book #: Greene -  749

 

+      35              ii.    Col. John Gordon Battelle, born 12 May 1845; died 10 May 1918.

        36             iii.    Ella Virginia Battelle, born 02 Sep 1847.  She married William Albert Dietrich.

+      37             iv.    Julia Elizabeth Battelle, born 22 May 1849 in Newport Ohio; died 30 Jan 1883.

        38              v.    Sarah Frances Battelle, born 20 Dec 1850.

        39             vi.    Cora White Battelle.  She married Clarence Milton Fenton.

 

More About Cora White Battelle:

Name 2: Cora Battelle

Geneology book #: Greene -  762

 

        40            vii.    Charles Waldo Battelle, born 04 Dec 1853; died 30 Dec 1854.

+      41           viii.    Emma Lydia Battelle, born 25 Nov 1856; died 12 Jun 1915.


 

        17.  Capt. Ebenezer Jr3 Battelle (Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 22 May 1817 in Newport Ohio, and died 1889.  He married Julia Putnam Barker 28 Apr 1841 in Washington Co OH, daughter of Joseph Barker and Melissa Stone.  She was born 1821.

 

Notes for Capt. Ebenezer Jr Battelle:

1860 Washington Co Newport, OH

Ebenezer Battelle 43 Oh Farmer

Julia 40 OH

J B 15 (m) OH

C D 12 (m) OH

J G 6 (m) OH

Harry 4 OH

Albert 2 OH

Melissa 6/12 OH --NOTE: this must be Lillie Stone listed in the records.

 

1870 Washington Co Newport OH

Ebaenezer Battelle 53 OH Farmer

Julia P 50 OH

Julius G 17 OH

Harry E 14 OH

Malissa S 10 OH

Alice 6 OH

 

1880 census Granville, Licking Co Ohio

E. Battelle 63 farmer OH, father b. MA, mother b. RI

Julia P 60 OH, father b. OH mother b. OH

Harry E 24 OH

Lillie S 20 OH

Alice 16 OH

 

He was a farmer and lived at the old Battelle homestead at Newport, Ohio for fifty years or more. In 1883 he was living inToledo, Ohio and in 1859 near Cincinnati, Ohio.

 

 

More About Capt. Ebenezer Jr Battelle:

Name 2: Ebenezer Battelle

Date born 2: 22 May 1817, Newport, Ohio

Died 2: 07 Dec 1892, Near Loveland, Ohio.

Burial: Newport, Ohio

Geneology book # 1: Greene -  552

Geneology book # 2: Greene - 082 - Gen3

Occupation: Farmer. Was superintendent of M.E. S. School for many years. Represented Washington County in the Ohio Legislature. Judge?

 

More About Ebenezer Battelle and Julia Barker:

Marriage: 28 Apr 1841, Washington Co OH

       

Children of Ebenezer Battelle and Julia Barker are:

        42               i.    Wesley Browning4 Battelle, born 30 Jan 1842; died Bef. 1860.

 

More About Wesley Browning Battelle:

Burial: Newport Ohio

 

+      43              ii.    Joseph Barker Battelle, born 15 Oct 1845; died Aft. 1920 in California.

        44             iii.    Charles Durant Battelle, born 27 Jan 1848.  He married Ida McDermott Roe.

 

Notes for Charles Durant Battelle:

1870 Ohio Clark Co Mt Union

C D Battelle 22 OH At school

 

        45             iv.    Marcus Ebenezer Battelle, born 16 Aug 1851.

        46              v.    Julian Gordon Battelle, born 13 Jun 1853.

 

Notes for Julian Gordon Battelle:

Resided in Detroit, Mi. was Editor of The Detroit Evening News

 

        47             vi.    Harry Ebenezer Battelle, born 06 Jun 1856.

        48            vii.    Albert Marshall Battelle, born 22 Jul 1858.

        49           viii.    Lillian Stone Battelle, born 19 Feb 1860.

 

Notes for Lillian Stone Battelle:

She was a teacher and unmarried. The Battelle records were kindly submitted to the late G.H. Greene of Lansing, Mi. who reported that the completeness of the record (even to later date than the limit of the limit of Gen. G.S. Greene's work allowed under the rule for the descendants of female Greenes) was largely due to Miss Lilian Stone Battelle.

 

 

 

        50             ix.    Alice Battelle, born 29 Jul 1863.

 

More About Alice Battelle:

Geneology book #: Greene -  780

 

 

        18.  Andrew Brimmer3 Battelle (Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 26 Sep 1820 in Newport, Ohio, and died 30 Apr 1887 in Bellaire, Ohio..  He married Elizabeth Mary Barker 23 Dec 1847 in Washington Co OH, daughter of Joseph Barker and Melissa Stone.  She was born 02 Feb 1824 in Newport Ohio, and died 03 Apr 1898 in Toledo, Lucas, OH.

 

Notes for Andrew Brimmer Battelle:

1880 Census Bellaire, Belmont Co OHIO

A. B. Batelle 59 OH Retired Merchant, father b. MA, mother b. CT

Elizabeth 56 OH father b OH mother b OH

Maria 26 OH

Bessie J. 23 OH

Fannie 20 OH

Nellie L 17 OH

Louis G 14 OH

 

In 1863 he removed from Newport, Ohio to Marietta, Ohio where he lived for eighteen years; thence to Bellaire, Ohio, where he was engaged as a travelling agent for an oil company.

 

Ohio Oil and Mining Company, filed Sept 27, 1864

Know all men by these presents that we William P Cutler, A B Battelle, J B Hovey, C B Wells, R Monroe, R P James and D P Bosworth do hereby associate ourselves together as a corporaton under and by virtue of the act of the General Assembly of the State of Ohio entitled an act to provide for the creation and regulation of Incorporated companies in the State Of Ohio passed May 1st 1852 and the acts supplementry and commadatory thereto for the purpose of carrying on the business of boring or digging for oil, salt or other vegitable medicinal fluids in the earth and for refining or fusifying the same and for mining coal ore and other minerals and manufacturing the same, and have agreed to do hereby agree and certify that the amount of capitol stock of said company shall be One Hundred Thousand Dollars with the privilege of increasing the same from time to time as provided in said acts divided into Two thousand shares of Fifty Dollars each.

 

The office and place of Business of the Corporation to be Marietta Ohio with the right to operate in Washington, Athens, Morgan and Noble Counties in the State of Ohio and in theCounties of Wood, Pleasants, Ritchie, Doddridge and within the State of West Virginia and theis corporation is to be known by the name and style of teh Ohio Oil and Mining Company.

 

Witness our hands and seals this twenty first day of September A. D. [signed and sealed by above named individuals]

Recorded in the Washington County Court on Oct. 10 and 18, 1864

 

1860 Newport Wash. co Ohio

A B Battelle 39 Oh farmer

Elizabeth M 36 OH

Mary I 11 OH

Rufus B 8 OH

Maira S 6 OH

Brimmer 5 OH

Elizabeth 3 OH

Fanny 1/12 OH

 

More About Andrew Brimmer Battelle:

Burial: Newport, Ohio

Geneology book # 1: Greene -  554

Geneology book # 2: Greene - 085 - Gen3

Occupation: Farmer and trader.

Physical Description: A large man.

Residence: Newport township, near Newport. Removed to Marietta and afterwards to Bellaire, Ohio.

 

Notes for Elizabeth Mary Barker:

 

   From: MEMOIRS OF THE EARLY PIONEER SETTLERS OF OHIO

                        By S.P. Hildreth, M.D., 1854

 

BARKER, Joseph - A native of New Market, Rockingham Co., N.H., born Sept. 9, 1765, son of Ephriam & Mary (Manning) Barker. His mother from Ipswich, Mass. Joseph married Elizabeth Dana.

 

 

More About Andrew Battelle and Elizabeth Barker:

Marriage: 23 Dec 1847, Washington Co OH

       

Children of Andrew Battelle and Elizabeth Barker are:

        51               i.    Mary Isabella4 Battelle, born 09 Apr 1849; died 09 Sep 1863.

 

Notes for Mary Isabella Battelle:

Marietta Register September 29, 1863

Battelle - In this city, 18th Inst., after a brief illness. Mary Isabella Battelle, in her 15th year - in the faith and love of her Redeemer.

In Memoriam - The following thoughts suggested by the death of Mary I. Battlelle, were unanimously adopted by the scholars of the Green Street Grammar School, Sept. 21, 1863.

As we look around our school-room today and see a vacant seat, sad thoughts fill our minds and we scarce can check the rising tear. we lament a departed love one. Yes, death had entered our school and chosen one of the finest members, Our Golden chain of friendship is perfect no longer. a bright link has been detached and transferred to its Maker above. May, it attract each of us to that happy place and though we al shall meet on earth no more, may we assemble a united school in heaven. We, her schoolmates, join together in extolling her sacred memory, and in testifying that while with us, Mary was a friend ever true and faithful. We all esteemed her for her amiable qualities of heart and mind. The recollection of her lady like deportment and untiring industry, is not lost for us, and we shall ever arrive to imitate the noble example she has left.

In our school the absent Mary

Shone a pleasant light;

But faded soon a pure white lily,

Stricken down with a sudden blight.

 

We miss her from that vacant seat;

A brother mourns a sister fled,

Fond parents weep in silent anguish

For a lovely daughter dead.

 

She sleeps fair girl, beneath the green sod.

Wrapt in long unbroken rest;

Herr pale lips sealed, her cold hand folded

On her calm, untroubled breast.

 

Sleep on, dear schoolmate, while winged seraphs

Guard thee with untiring trust;

And love, most holy, keeps her constant watch

Round thy consecrated dust.

 

Marietta Register October 16, 1863

The following obituary notice should have appeared three week ago, when the death was announced, but through oversight it did not.

In this city, 18th of September, 1863, in the 15th year of her age Mary Isabella, daughter of A. B. and E. M. Battelle, Marietta. late of Newport, Washington Co. Ohio.

Mary's illness was brief and her death sudden. but she was not unprepared to die. She had been early devoted to God by maternal consecration and carefully instructed in principles and duties of our holy religion; and though young, she had for some time lived in the habit of daily prayer, and consequently of submission to God: and i her dying moments gave clear evidence of personal trust in the Lord Jesus, and of personal participation in the saving benefits of his redeeming grace. H. K. Foster.

 

More About Mary Isabella Battelle:

Geneology book #: Greene -  783

 

        52              ii.    Rufus Barker Battelle, born 10 Jan 1852; died 21 Jul 1921.  He married Emma Eliza Benny.

 

More About Rufus Barker Battelle:

Geneology book #: Greene -  784

 

+      53             iii.    Marie Antoinette Battelle, born 08 Sep 1853 in Newport Ohio; died 18 Oct 1920 in Willimantic CT.

        54             iv.    W Brimmer Battelle, born 25 May 1855; died 07 Oct 1880.  He married Jennie Atwood.

 

More About W Brimmer Battelle:

Name 2: W. Bremer Battelle

Geneology book #: Greene -   787

 

        55              v.    Julia Elizabeth Bessie Battelle, born 21 Jun 1857; died 02 Jan 1921.  She married Clinton Brooke.

 

More About Julia Elizabeth Bessie Battelle:

Name 2: Bessie Battelle

Geneology book #: Greene -   793

 

        56             vi.    Frances Phebe Fannie Battelle, born 01 May 1860; died 19 Dec 1919.  She married Jack Funk.

 

More About Frances Phebe Fannie Battelle:

Name 2: Fannie G. Battelle

Geneology book #: Greene -  796

 

        57            vii.    Ellen Louise Nellie Battelle, born 02 Jul 1865; died 1910.  She married James Preston Clarke 14 Aug 1893.

 

More About Ellen Louise Nellie Battelle:

Name 2: Nellie Battelle

Geneology book #: Greene -  799

 

More About James Clarke and Ellen Battelle:

Marriage: 14 Aug 1893

 

+      58           viii.    Louis Gordon Battelle, born 01 Apr 1866; died 03 Sep 1957.

 

 

Generation No. 4

 

        21.  Alpheus Monroe4 Battelle (Cornelius Durant3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 24 Apr 1830 in Virginia, and died Bet. 1900 - 1910 in Kansas Brown Co Hiawatha twp.  He married (1) Mintie A. Beymer.    He married (2) Armarintha Adela Beyer 29 Jun 1852.  She was born 07 Jan 1832 in Ohio, and died Bet. 1900 - 1910 in Kansas Brown Co Hiawatha twp.

 

Notes for Alpheus Monroe Battelle:

1860 Iowa Pottwattamie Knox Twp

Alpheus M Battelle 29 Va farmer

Arninetta 25    OH

Elizabeth 7 OH

Annabel 4 OH

William D 2 Iowa

 

1870 Iowa Pottwattamie Knox Twp

AM Battelle 40 OH farmer

Arimenthia 38 OH

Elisabeth 17 OH

Anna 15 WV

Wm 12 Iowa

Affie 9 Iowa

Chas 7 Iowa

Nellie 8 Iowa

Nettie 3 Iowa

 

1900 Kansas Brown Co Hiawatha twp

Alpheus Battelle Apr 1830 WV m 38 yrs farmer

Arimintha Jan 1832 Oh 7 births 7 living children

Alpheus Jan 1861 Iowa farmer

 

 

More About Alpheus Monroe Battelle:

Geneology book #: Greene -  732

 

More About Mintie A. Beymer:

Geneology book #: Greene -  733

 

More About Alpheus Battelle and Armarintha Beyer:

Marriage: 29 Jun 1852

       

Children of Alpheus Battelle and Armarintha Beyer are:

        59               i.    Elizabeth5 Battelle, born 27 May 1853 in Ohio.  She married John Matthews Abt. 1883; born Feb 1851 in Indiana.

 

Notes for John Matthews:

1900 Pottowamie Co Council Bluffs Iowa

John M Matthews Feb 1851 IN m 17 yrs Clerk

Elizabeth May 1853 OH 0 children

 

More About John Matthews and Elizabeth Battelle:

Marriage: Abt. 1883

 

        60              ii.    Annabel Amelia Battelle, born 20 Jul 1855 in Virginia.  She married John Converse.

        61             iii.    William Cornelius Battelle, born 25 Jun 1858 in Iowa.  He married Nancy Ellen Blaire in Council Bluffs, Iowa.

 

More About William Battelle and Nancy Blaire:

Marriage: Council Bluffs, Iowa

 

        62             iv.    Alpheus Monroe Jr. Battelle, born 17 Dec 1862.

 

Notes for Alpheus Monroe Jr. Battelle:

1910 Kansas Brown Co Hiawatha twp

Alfred Battelle 49 Iowa single -Porter - living in boarding house

 

+      63              v.    Charles Arthur Battelle, born 27 Dec 1862 in Iowa.

        64             vi.    Nellie Battelle, born 02 Jan 1864.  She married David W Cressey.

        65            vii.    Mary Nettie Battelle, born 13 Nov 1867.

 

 


 

        23.  William Greenwood4 Battelle (Cornelius Durant3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 15 Dec 1835, and died 02 Mar 1869 in Wheeling WV.  He married Anna Mariah MaClain 04 Feb 1858. 

 

Notes for William Greenwood Battelle:

Marietta Register March 11, 1869

Deaths - Battelle - On Wheeling Island, at this home on the 2d inst. Wm. G. Battelle, of the well known firm of Booth, Battelle & Co., Wheeling and son of Rev. C. D. Battelle, formerly of this county.

 

More About William Greenwood Battelle:

Geneology book #: Greene -   734

 

More About William Battelle and Anna MaClain:

Marriage: 04 Feb 1858

       

Children of William Battelle and Anna MaClain are:

        66               i.    James Kelly5 Battelle, born 30 Jan 1859; died 06 May 1880.

+      67              ii.    Marietta Margaret Battelle, born 24 Sep 1860.

 

 

        24.  Amelia Gordonia4 Battelle (Cornelius Durant3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 19 Oct 1840.  She married Robert Alexander Jones 20 Sep 1860. 

 

More About Robert Jones and Amelia Battelle:

Marriage: 20 Sep 1860

       

Children of Amelia Battelle and Robert Jones are:

        68               i.    Robert Greenwood5 Jones, born 21 Jul 1863.

        69              ii.    Mortimer Bryant Jones, born 31 Jan 1867.

 

 

        25.  Elizabeth Amanda4 Battelle (Cornelius Durant3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 17 Dec 1847 in Ohio, and died Aft. 1920.  She married Winfield Scott Holden 08 Nov 1866.  He was born 14 May 1845 in Ohio, and died Bet. 1910 - 1920.

 

More About Elizabeth Amanda Battelle:

Geneology book #: Greene -  738

 

Notes for Winfield Scott Holden:

1900 Hamilton County Cincinnati Ohio

810 Oak St

Winfield Holden May 14, 1845 OH 55 M 34 yrs., ? Researcher

Elizabeth Dec 17. 1847 OH 4 births 4 living children

Alma Feb 22, 1872 KY Stenographer

Elizabeth Sept 8, 1876 KY Music Teacher

Winfield L Sept 8, 1882 OH Insurance Agent

 

1910 Hamilton County, Cincinnati Ohio

2193 T??? Lane (next street listed Calvin Street)

Winfield Holden 65 OH Clerk at U. S. Internal Rev.

Elizabeth 63 OH

Alma 39 Stenographer at Soap Co.

servant-

 

 

 

More About Winfield Holden and Elizabeth Battelle:

Marriage: 08 Nov 1866

       

Children of Elizabeth Battelle and Winfield Holden are:

        70               i.    Charles Battelle5 Holden, born 24 Sep 1868.

        71              ii.    Alma Linda Holden, born 22 Feb 1871 in Kentucky.

+      72             iii.    Elizabeth Holden, born 08 Sep 1876 in Kentucky.

+      73             iv.    Winfield Lloyd Holden, born 08 Sep 1882 in Ohio.

 

 

        27.  Thorton Fleming4 Battelle (Thomas Smith3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 26 Nov 1834.  He married Corylynn Elvira Parker. 

 

More About Thorton Fleming Battelle:

Name 2: Thornton F. Battelle

Geneology book #: Greene -  740

       

Children of Thorton Battelle and Corylynn Parker are:

        74               i.    Grace Flemming5 Battelle.

        75              ii.    Thomas Albert Battelle.

 

 

        35.  Col. John Gordon4 Battelle (Gordon3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 12 May 1845, and died 10 May 1918.  He married Annie Maude Norton.  She was born 26 Jan 1863, and died 23 Mar 1925.

 

Notes for Col. John Gordon Battelle:

Battelle, Annie Norton (1863-1925) — also known as Mrs. John G. Battelle — of Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Born January 26, 1863. Married to John Gordon Battelle (1845-1918). Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1924; member of Republican National Committee from Ohio, 1924. Female. Died March 23, 1925. Entombed in mausoleum at Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio

 

More About Col. John Gordon Battelle:

Name 2: John G. Battelle

Burial: Greenlawn Cemetery Columbus Ohio

Geneology book #: Greene -  751

 

More About Annie Maude Norton:

Burial: Greenlawn Cemetery Columbus Ohio

       

Child of John Battelle and Annie Norton is:

        76               i.    Gordon5 Battelle, born 10 Aug 1883; died 21 Sep 1923.

 

More About Gordon Battelle:

Burial: Greenlawn Cemetery Columbus Ohio

 

 

        37.  Julia Elizabeth4 Battelle (Gordon3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 22 May 1849 in Newport Ohio, and died 30 Jan 1883.  She married Rev John William Hamilton 24 Dec 1873, son of William Hamilton and Henrietta Dean.  He was born 18 Mar 1845 in Weston, WV, and died 24 Jul 1934 in Boston Mass.

 

More About Julia Elizabeth Battelle:

Name 2: Julia E. Battelle

Geneology book #: Greene -  756

 

Notes for Rev John William Hamilton:

Taken from a speech give by Miss M. Ethel Hays at the Newport Methodist Church dates about 1960;

"it was in 1866 that Rev. John W. Hamilton came to the Newport Church. this was his first appointment, and while here, he marries Julia Elizabeth Battelle, the [grand]daughter of Ebenezer and Mary Greene Battelle. The Greene and the Battelles we among the first settlers of Newport and to Ebenezer Battelle goes the credit of plotting this village. In the later years after the death of his first wife, Rev. Hamilton married her sister, Emma Battelle."

 

1900 Ohio, Hamilton County, Cincinnate, 31st Ward, 611 Mound Ave.

John W Hamilton Mar 1845, m. 12 years b. Va Bishop ME Church

Emma L, Nov 1855, 1 child

Gordon B, Feb 1877, b Mass. at school

Helene, Dec 1891, b Mass.

 

Taken from Minutes of the Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church Spring Conferences 1934, Methodist Book Concern

Bishop John William Hamilton

        The second of five sons of the Rev. William Cooper Patrick and Henrietts Maria Dean Hamilton, was born in Weston, Virginia (now West Virginia), march 18, 1845. He attended Summerfield Academy and taught school before he was sixteen. He entered Mount Union College in 1860. He answered President Lincoln's call for Volenteers in April, 1861, but was rejected because of this age. He was musterd into the Union Army in 1862, serving as a corporal in General Buell's command in Kentucky.

        He was graduated from Mount Union College in 1865. He was Admited on Trail in the Pittsburgh Conference in 1868. He was graduated from Boston University School of theology in 1871, haveing served as a student pastor at maplewood, Mass. Transferring to the New England Conference, he founded People's Church in boston and served as its pastor for nine years. He was a delegate to the General Conferences  of 1884, 1888, 1892, and 1900.  In 1892 he was delegate toa the General Conferences of the Freeman's Aid and Southern Education Society, in which capacity he served for eight years. In 1900 he was elected the forty-sixth bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Churhc, residing in San Francisco from 1900 to 1908 and in boston from 1908 to 1916. He retired 1916, but served a Chancellor of the American University from 1916 to 1924.

        On December 24, 1873, he was married to Miss Julia Elizabeth Battelle, who passed away January 30, 1883. On December 18, 1888, he married Miss Emma Lydia Battelle, who died July 12, 1915.

        He was recipient of the following degrees; A. B., Mount Union University College, 1865; S.T.B., Boston University, 1871; A.M., Wesleyan University, 1877; D.D., Baker University, 1880; LL.D., University of Southern California, 1905; DePauw University, 1905; Mount Union College, 1905 and L.H.D., American University. He was preacher, author, educator, administrator and friend of every good cause.

        Since his retirement, Bishop Hamilton made his home in Washington D.C., with a summer home in Marshfield, Mass. He was taken sick at Marshfield and was removed to the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, from whence this stawart, sun-crowned, friendly man went home to be with God on Monday, July 23, 1934 in his 90th year. A son, Major Gordon Battelle Hamilton, and a daughter, Mrs. Geoffery Wardle Stafford; a brother, Wilbur Dean Hamilton; and a sister, Mrs S.L. Parks survive. The funeral services were held in Saint Marks Church, Brookline, Mass., in charge of President D.L Marsh of Bonston University. Bishops McDowell and Burns delivered addresses and Bishops Anderson and Thrikield and Dr. L.O Hartman assisted in the services. Burial was in Forest Hills Cemetery, Boston.

 

From The Journal and Year Book of the Seventh Session of the Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church held in the Grace Methodist Episcopal Church, Zanesville, Ohio September 17, 1934

 

Memoirs: Bishop John W Hamilton, born March 18, 1845, Weston Virginia; Licensed to preach, 1865; Secretary Freeman's Aid Societly, 1892-1900; Elected Bishop, 1900; Died Boston, Massachusetts, July 24, 1934

 

More About Rev John William Hamilton:

Date born 2: 18 Mar 1845

 

More About John Hamilton and Julia Battelle:

Marriage: 24 Dec 1873

       

Child of Julia Battelle and John Hamilton is:

+      77               i.    Dr. Gordon Battelle5 Hamilton, born Feb 1877 in Massachusetts.

 

 

        41.  Emma Lydia4 Battelle (Gordon3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 25 Nov 1856, and died 12 Jun 1915.  She married Rev John William Hamilton 18 Dec 1888, son of William Hamilton and Henrietta Dean.  He was born 18 Mar 1845 in Weston, WV, and died 24 Jul 1934 in Boston Mass.

 

Notes for Rev John William Hamilton:

Taken from a speech give by Miss M. Ethel Hays at the Newport Methodist Church dates about 1960;

"it was in 1866 that Rev. John W. Hamilton came to the Newport Church. this was his first appointment, and while here, he marries Julia Elizabeth Battelle, the [grand]daughter of Ebenezer and Mary Greene Battelle. The Greene and the Battelles we among the first settlers of Newport and to Ebenezer Battelle goes the credit of plotting this village. In the later years after the death of his first wife, Rev. Hamilton married her sister, Emma Battelle."

 

1900 Ohio, Hamilton County, Cincinnate, 31st Ward, 611 Mound Ave.

John W Hamilton Mar 1845, m. 12 years b. Va Bishop ME Church

Emma L, Nov 1855, 1 child

Gordon B, Feb 1877, b Mass. at school

Helene, Dec 1891, b Mass.

 

Taken from Minutes of the Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church Spring Conferences 1934, Methodist Book Concern

Bishop John William Hamilton

        The second of five sons of the Rev. William Cooper Patrick and Henrietts Maria Dean Hamilton, was born in Weston, Virginia (now West Virginia), march 18, 1845. He attended Summerfield Academy and taught school before he was sixteen. He entered Mount Union College in 1860. He answered President Lincoln's call for Volenteers in April, 1861, but was rejected because of this age. He was musterd into the Union Army in 1862, serving as a corporal in General Buell's command in Kentucky.

        He was graduated from Mount Union College in 1865. He was Admited on Trail in the Pittsburgh Conference in 1868. He was graduated from Boston University School of theology in 1871, haveing served as a student pastor at maplewood, Mass. Transferring to the New England Conference, he founded People's Church in boston and served as its pastor for nine years. He was a delegate to the General Conferences  of 1884, 1888, 1892, and 1900.  In 1892 he was delegate toa the General Conferences of the Freeman's Aid and Southern Education Society, in which capacity he served for eight years. In 1900 he was elected the forty-sixth bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Churhc, residing in San Francisco from 1900 to 1908 and in boston from 1908 to 1916. He retired 1916, but served a Chancellor of the American University from 1916 to 1924.

        On December 24, 1873, he was married to Miss Julia Elizabeth Battelle, who passed away January 30, 1883. On December 18, 1888, he married Miss Emma Lydia Battelle, who died July 12, 1915.

        He was recipient of the following degrees; A. B., Mount Union University College, 1865; S.T.B., Boston University, 1871; A.M., Wesleyan University, 1877; D.D., Baker University, 1880; LL.D., University of Southern California, 1905; DePauw University, 1905; Mount Union College, 1905 and L.H.D., American University. He was preacher, author, educator, administrator and friend of every good cause.

        Since his retirement, Bishop Hamilton made his home in Washington D.C., with a summer home in Marshfield, Mass. He was taken sick at Marshfield and was removed to the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, from whence this stawart, sun-crowned, friendly man went home to be with God on Monday, July 23, 1934 in his 90th year. A son, Major Gordon Battelle Hamilton, and a daughter, Mrs. Geoffery Wardle Stafford; a brother, Wilbur Dean Hamilton; and a sister, Mrs S.L. Parks survive. The funeral services were held in Saint Marks Church, Brookline, Mass., in charge of President D.L Marsh of Bonston University. Bishops McDowell and Burns delivered addresses and Bishops Anderson and Thrikield and Dr. L.O Hartman assisted in the services. Burial was in Forest Hills Cemetery, Boston.

 

From The Journal and Year Book of the Seventh Session of the Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church held in the Grace Methodist Episcopal Church, Zanesville, Ohio September 17, 1934

 

Memoirs: Bishop John W Hamilton, born March 18, 1845, Weston Virginia; Licensed to preach, 1865; Secretary Freeman's Aid Societly, 1892-1900; Elected Bishop, 1900; Died Boston, Massachusetts, July 24, 1934

 

More About Rev John William Hamilton:

Date born 2: 18 Mar 1845

 

More About John Hamilton and Emma Battelle:

Marriage: 18 Dec 1888

       

Child of Emma Battelle and John Hamilton is:

        78               i.    Helene5 Hamilton, born Dec 1891.  She married Geoffery Wardle Stafford.

 

 

        43.  Joseph Barker4 Battelle (Ebenezer Jr3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 15 Oct 1845, and died Aft. 1920 in California.  He married Emma D Clark.  She was born Sep 1850, and died Aft. 1920 in California.

 

Notes for Joseph Barker Battelle:

1900 Lucas Co Toledo Ohio

Joseph B Battelle Oct 1849 50 OH m 29yrs Editor

Emma C Sept 1850 49 OH 4 births 3 living children

Clifford C May 1876 24 OH Collector

Chirstine C Apr 1884 OH

Girard C Oct 1882 17 OH

 

1910 Los Angeles Co CA San Grabiel Twp

Joseph B Battelle 60 OH m 33yrs own income

Emma C 50 KY 4 births 3 living children

Christine C 25 OH Music Teacher

 

1920 Los Angeles Co CA Pasadena 3000 N Raymond Ave

Joseph B Battelle 70

Emma 69 Girard 32 clerk

       

Children of Joseph Battelle and Emma Clark are:

+      79               i.    Clifford Clarke5 Battelle, born 11 May 1876 in Ohio; died 14 Feb 1953 in San Bernardino CA.

        80              ii.    Marcus Clarke Battelle, born Abt. 1880; died Abt. 1880.

        81             iii.    Christine Clarke Battelle, born Oct 1882.

        82             iv.    Girard Clarke Battelle, born 23 Apr 1884 in Ohio; died 16 Oct 1961 in Los Angeles CA.

 

 

        53.  Marie Antoinette4 Battelle (Andrew Brimmer3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 08 Sep 1853 in Newport Ohio, and died 18 Oct 1920 in Willimantic CT.  She married John Lawrence Schilling.  He was born 1842 in Harpers Ferry VA, and died 15 Mar 1958 in Willimantic, CT.

 

More About Marie Antoinette Battelle:

Name 2: Maria Battelle

Geneology book #: Greene -   790

       

Child of Marie Battelle and John Schilling is:

+      83               i.    Nellie Battelle5 Schilling, born 24 Feb 1892 in Bellaire OH; died 23 Aug 1972 in Hartford CT.

 

 

        58.  Louis Gordon4 Battelle (Andrew Brimmer3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 01 Apr 1866, and died 03 Sep 1957.  He married Annie Sellers. 

 

More About Louis Gordon Battelle:

Name 2: Louis Bordon Battelle

Geneology book #: Greene -  802

       

Child of Louis Battelle and Annie Sellers is:

        84               i.    Gordon Sellers5 Battelle, born 07 Sep 1888.


 

Generation No. 5

 

        63.  Charles Arthur5 Battelle (Alpheus Monroe4, Cornelius Durant3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 27 Dec 1862 in Iowa.  He married Mary E Unknown.  She was born Mar 1876 in KS.

 

Notes for Charles Arthur Battelle:

1900 Kansas Brown Co Hiawatha twp

Charles B Battelle Dec 1862 Iowa m 6yrs farmer

Mary E Mar 1876 KS 3births 3 living children

Frederick Keb 1895 KS

Frank July 1897 KS

Holden (f) Nov 1899 KS

       

Children of Charles Battelle and Mary Unknown are:

        85               i.    Frederick6 Battelle, born Feb 1895 in KS.  He married Elda M Poutz; born 28 Oct 1901 in KS.

 

Notes for Frederick Battelle:

Fred J. Battelle 1 2

Sex: M

Birth: ABT 1895 in Kansas

Death: 18 SEP 1957

Census: 2 APR 1930 St. Joseph City, Washington Township, Ward of City 5 (part of), Buchanan Co., Missouri, Enumeration District No. 11 - 34, Supervisor's District No. 1, Sheet No. 1 B, Dwelling No. 615 South 14th Street

Census: 9 JAN 1920 Hiawatha City, Brown Co., Kansas, Supervisor's District No. 101, Enumeration District No. 22, Ward of City Third, Sheet No. 8 A, Dwelling No. 603 Pottowatomia Street

Occupation: 2 APR 1930 Salesman

Note: The 1930 federal census for Buchanan Co., Missouri shows that he was 22 years old when he first married. The 1930 census also shows that his father was born in Iowa and his mother born in Kansas.

 

 

        86              ii.    Frank Battelle, born Jul 1897.

        87             iii.    Holben Battelle, born Nov 1899.

 

 

        67.  Marietta Margaret5 Battelle (William Greenwood4, Cornelius Durant3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 24 Sep 1860.  She married Harry J Mendel. 

       

Children of Marietta Battelle and Harry Mendel are:

        88               i.    Anna Bettelle6 Mendel, born 28 Mar 1890.

        89              ii.    Clerimont Woodward Mendel, born 14 Aug 1893; died 25 May 1995.  She married Ralph Edmund I Spears 04 Sep 1917 in Wheeling (WV).

 

More About Ralph Spears and Clerimont Mendel:

Marriage: 04 Sep 1917, Wheeling (WV)

 

 

        72.  Elizabeth5 Holden (Elizabeth Amanda4 Battelle, Cornelius Durant3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 08 Sep 1876 in Kentucky.  She married Frank F. Hallock Aft. 1900 in Wheeling (WV).  He was born Abt. 1876 in Ohio.

 

Notes for Frank F. Hallock:

1910 Ohio Co Madison Dristrict Wheeling WV

300 N Front Street

Frank F Hallock 32 OH m 5yrs Bookkeeper Shoe store

Elizabeth H 32 KY 3 births 2 living children

Lawrence G 4 OH

Elizabeth 2 WV

 

1920 Middlesex Co Winchester Mass

123 Mount Vernon St

Frank F Hallock 42 OH Salesman Steel ?

Elizabeth 42 KY

Lawrence G 14 OH

Elizabeth 12 WV

Robert 5 Mass

 

More About Frank Hallock and Elizabeth Holden:

Marriage: Aft. 1900, Wheeling (WV)

       

Children of Elizabeth Holden and Frank Hallock are:

        90               i.    Lawrence G6 Hallock, born Abt. 1906 in Ohio.

        91              ii.    Elizabeth B Hallock, born Abt. 1908 in WV.

        92             iii.    Robert Hallock, born Abt. 1914.

 

 

        73.  Winfield Lloyd5 Holden (Elizabeth Amanda4 Battelle, Cornelius Durant3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 08 Sep 1882 in Ohio.  He married Elizabeth G Unknown Abt. 1909.  She was born Abt. 1887 in Ohio, and died Bef. 1920.

 

Notes for Winfield Lloyd Holden:

1910 Marion Co Center Twp Indianapolis Ind.

419 N Pennsylvania Ave.

Winfield L Holden 27 OH m 1yr Agent in Manufacturing Co

Elizabeth G 23 OH

 

1920 Wayne Co Detroit Mich

1151 Virginia Park

Winfield S Holden 37 OH Wd Agent Weather Stripper

Marjorie S dau 5 Ind

Elizabeth mother 73 wd OH

Alma sister 48 KY Stenographer paper manufacturing

 

More About Winfield Holden and Elizabeth Unknown:

Marriage: Abt. 1909

       

Child of Winfield Holden and Elizabeth Unknown is:

        93               i.    Marjorie S6 Holden, born Abt. 1914.

 

 

        77.  Dr. Gordon Battelle5 Hamilton (Julia Elizabeth4 Battelle, Gordon3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born Feb 1877 in Massachusetts.  He married Annie M B Fyfe 1908.  She was born 27 Aug 1877 in California.

 

Notes for Dr. Gordon Battelle Hamilton:

1910 Nevada, Washoe County, 4Ward Reno, 846 Lake Rt

Dr. GB Hamilton 33 Physician b. Mass. m. 1yr

Anna 33 b. Calif

Elizabeth R. 1 yr b Nev.

 

More About Dr. Gordon Battelle Hamilton:

Occupation: Medical Doctor

 

More About Gordon Hamilton and Annie Fyfe:

Marriage: 1908

       

Child of Gordon Hamilton and Annie Fyfe is:

        94               i.    Jean Elizabeth6 Hamilton, born 13 Apr 1909.

 

 

        79.  Clifford Clarke5 Battelle (Joseph Barker4, Ebenezer Jr3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 11 May 1876 in Ohio, and died 14 Feb 1953 in San Bernardino CA.  He married Grace Zimmerman Abt. 1907.  She was born 08 Oct 1879 in Indiana, and died 17 Dec 1960 in San Bernardino CA.

 

More About Clifford Battelle and Grace Zimmerman:

Marriage: Abt. 1907

       

Children of Clifford Battelle and Grace Zimmerman are:

        95               i.    Alice G6 Battelle, born Abt. 1908.

        96              ii.    Clifford Z Battelle, born 20 Jun 1908; died 05 Feb 1978 in Los Angeles CA.

        97             iii.    Charles Brownell Battelle, born 29 Jul 1911 in Michigan; died 09 Jun 1985 in San Diego CA.

        98             iv.    Elizabeth Battelle, born Abt. 1914.

        99              v.    Marsha Battelle, born Abt. 1917.

 

 

        83.  Nellie Battelle5 Schilling (Marie Antoinette4 Battelle, Andrew Brimmer3, Ebenezer2, Ebenezer1, EbenezerA, EbenezerB, JohnC, ThomasD) was born 24 Feb 1892 in Bellaire OH, and died 23 Aug 1972 in Hartford CT.  She married Archibald Randall Sharpe 1915.  He was born 1892 in Seymore CT.

 

More About Archibald Sharpe and Nellie Schilling:

Marriage: 1915

       

Child of Nellie Schilling and Archibald Sharpe is:

        100             i.    Joyce Durant6 Sharp, born 18 Jun 1918 in Willimantic CT; died in Willimantic, CT.  She married John F Heckman 19 May 1939 in Hartford CT.

 

More About John Heckman and Joyce Sharp:

Marriage: 19 May 1939, Hartford CT